GUIDELINES

ICC International Umpire Accreditation Program

 

4.9 Ball changes, shape/colour/tampering

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Competent: No
Competence Required
The umpire demonstrates:
Observation or video evidence, with date Further professional development required Assessor Competent
Competence in applying ICC protocols with regard to changing the ball No

ICC International Umpire Accreditation Program

 

Umpire progress

 
Section Progress
4.1 Judgement
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4.2 Judgement of front foot No balls
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4.3 Judgement of run out
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4.4 Judgement of LBW
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4.5 Judgement of caught behind
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4.6 Judgement of bat/pad
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4.7 Judgement of Doubtful bowling action
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4.8 3rd Umpire Decision Module
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4.9 Ball changes, shape/colour/tampering
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4.9 Ball changes, shape/colour/tampering

You must successfully demonstrate:
You are competent in applying ICC protocols with regard to changing the ball

Changing the ball has a significant impact on the game and is an important decision. ICC expects its international umpires to use the ‘rings’ when deciding on shape and also the experience within the PCT when deciding on changing the condition of the ball.

For shape, the umpires in the first instance are expected to inspect the ball and then use the ‘rings’ accordingly. When the ball does not go through, this is the best way to sell the decision that the ball is in fact out of shape. (See right: 4.8 Video 482, NZ v WI 1st Test Dec 2013). Any ball replaced due to being out of shape should be marked and given back to the Match Referee and Home Board.

Colour – presently (2014), with two white balls used for ODIs, it should be a rare occasion when umpires are required to replace a ball due to colour. If a ball does have to be replaced, then it is logical to have to replace it with one that is whiter (and perhaps less use). Umpires should only change a ball for colour under extreme circumstances and only if the batsmen have complained about it in the first instance. If a player does not raise the issue, then the umpires should not get involved in this area.

Changing the condition of the ball (ball tampering) is a serious issue and one that carries some stigma of ‘cheating’ with the players. A decision on this issue should not be taken lightly. ICC expects the umpires to make frequent inspections of the ball throughout the innings and also at the fall of a wicket. Decisions on this issue should be made by both on-field umpires (and occasionally with the help of the 3rd Umpire based on video evidence – see right: Code of Conduct Report Form, Faf du Plessis). The protocol is clearly laid out in the ICC Almanac.