GUIDELINES

ICC International Umpire Accreditation Program

 

4.6 Judgement of bat/pad

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Competent: No
Competence Required
The umpire demonstrates:
Observation or video evidence, with date Further professional development required Assessor Competent
A high degree of accuracy in judging bat/pad decisions No

ICC International Umpire Accreditation Program

 

Umpire progress

 
Section Progress
4.1 Judgement
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4.2 Judgement of front foot No balls
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4.3 Judgement of run out
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4.4 Judgement of LBW
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4.5 Judgement of caught behind
(0/1)
4.6 Judgement of bat/pad
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4.7 Judgement of Doubtful bowling action
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4.8 3rd Umpire Decision Module
(0/6)
4.9 Ball changes, shape/colour/tampering
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4.6 Judgement of bat/pad

You must successfully demonstrate:
A high degree of accuracy in judging bat/pad decisions

ICC recognises that this is one of the most difficult on field decisions. There are a number of helpful tips to assist you in making the correct decision – see the information in the columns opposite.

Listen for the types of noises, and timing of the noises:

  • Are there two clear noises? View the videos opposite (Video resources of best practice: Two clear noises) and listen to the audio. Where was the bat in relation to the ball?
  • When you view the videos refer to the notes in Bat pad training tips, and Bat Pad Decision Tips (See Resources to read: Bat Pad Decision Tips)
  • Trust your instincts and watch the speed of the ball after impact
  • How far in front of the pad was the bat? Should the batsman play the ball with his ‘bat’ out in front of his pad, then any edge is likely to go square of him – the reason for this is because after the ball hits the edge of the bat, the ball is more likely to hit the outside edges of the pad and then shoot out towards a fielder.
  • When the striker plays with his ‘bat’ behind his front pad – the appeal has to be considered on the basis that it is a likely pad / bat decision. This is a harder decision to make in many cases as it can be hard to actually distinguish what the second noise may be. When you view the videos refer to the notes in Bat pad training tips, and Bat Pad Decision Tips (Resources to read).
  • Not only do you have to give yourself some extra time to hear the extra sound, but you also need time to process it and decide what type of sound it was. Was it a ‘paddy’ sound, a ‘fleshy’ sound, a ‘woody’ sound, bat hitting ground or bat hitting pad?
  • Often in noisy or windy environments you do not always get to hear what you need to hear. Under these conditions, you have to learn to TRUST your eyesight implicitly which is very challenging for a decision that requires the use of sight and sound. For this to work, you really have to be focussing on the ball – where it pitches, what it hit and where it was going. The only way that you can effectively do this is by telling yourself as it happens (in your mind).
  • Just because you are convinced that the batsman has ‘hit’ the ball, it is very easy to switch off and forget that you still may have to rule on the ball carrying and being fairly caught!
  • It is vital that you make up your own mind based on what you have seen or heard and not be influenced by other factors – when you view the videos refer to the notes in Bat pad training tips, and Bat Pad Decision Tips (See Resources to read: Bat Pad Decision Tips).
Rule 1: Two clear noises

Rule 2: Bat out in front of pad

Rule 3: Bat behind pad

Rule 4: Type of sound

Rule 5: Trusting your eyes: where is the ball in relation to bat and glove?

Rule 6: Don’t switch off. Other things to consider: did the ball carry?

Rule 7: Give it as you hear and see it, and don’t be influenced by appeals